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I'm using TEI-compliant SGML to produce software documentation,
using CoST to translate from SGML to TeX for printing.  I've
encountered what is really an SGML problem, not a TEI problem,
but I thought I'd ask here since the SGML expertise here is high,
and since I can see this problem arising in a number of situations
where the TEI is used.
 
(I know I should just check Goldfarb's book, but I can't afford
Goldfarb's book.)
 
Consider a situation like that illustrated by the following fragment
from a title page.  In it, I'm trying to format my SGML/TEI source with
consistent indentation because, to me, this source file is
essentially a program to produce a document.  As such, I'd like
to make it clear to someone with a programmer's aesthetic sense.
(Also, one of the advantages of using SGML is that it allows my source
documents to be expressed in a printable-ASCII line-oriented form -
unlike most word processors - which allows me to use revision control
systems such as RCS on them.  The blocking and indentation of the source
helps to minimize the amount of processing RCS has to do.)
 
Anyway, here's the fragment:
 
...
      <docImprint>
         <publisher>
            <hi rend=OurLogoType>Our Company's Name Goes Here</hi>
         </publisher>
...
 
However, if you run this through sgmls, it gives you the newline and
blanks space between <docImprint> and <publisher>, and between
<publisher> and <hi> as data.  Of course, this data gets passed on
to CoST, and subsequently to TeX.  TeX very pleasantly ignores this,
but it still produces a very messy .tex file.  More importantly,
in the future I may be translating this document into languages
other than TeX which do not handle this so gracefully.
 
I could avoid this by running all of the above together on one line,
but that produces lines > 80 characters, which are unwelcome.
 
Is there anything in SGML equivalent to TeX's ability to say somthing
like:
 
      \imprint{%
          \pubisher{%
              {\bf Our Name here}
 
where the "%" suppresses the newline, and where all blank space at the
beginning of the line is ignored?
 
Thanks,
David M. MacMillan
[log in to unmask]
 
P.S.  To CMSMcQ:  It's because of your 1992 MLA presentation on the
                  TEI that I'm doing this.  Keep up the good propaganda.