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On Mon, 30 Jan 1995 09:28:03 CST Luis Villar said:
>I have come across a metrically incomplete line of verse in a play
>which is divided among four speakers.  The guide provides for three
>possible legal values
>
><l part=i>
><l part=m>
><l part=f>
>
>The value "F" identifies "the final part of an incomplete line."
>How should I consider the fouth and final part of the incomplete
>line?
>
>Could it be:
><l part=ff>
>or
><l part=f1>
>or
><l part=fa>  ?
 
I'm not sure I understand completely.  If as you say the fourth part is
the 'fourth and final part' of the line, then it should be tagged
<l part=F>, since it is 'the final part of an incomplete line'.  The
first should be <l part=I>, the two middle ones should be <l part=M>,
like this:
 
  <sp who=Hughie> <l part=I>And ten ...</l></sp>
  <sp who=Louie>  <l part=M>... low words ...</l></sp>
  <sp who=Dewey>  <l part=M>... oft creep ...</l></sp>
  <sp who=Donald> <l part=F>... in one dull line.</l></sp>
 
Both Louie's and Dewey's part of the line are medial; we know the order
they come in, because we know the order in which they appear in the
text.  If Dewey were to say his part out of turn, we could use the PREV
and NEXT attributes of the linking tag set to set things right:
 
  <sp who=Hughie> <l part=I id=A next=B>And ten ...</l></sp>
  <sp who=Dewey>  <l part=M id=C next=D>... oft creep ...</l></sp>
  <sp who=Louie>  <l part=M id=B next=C>... low words ...</l></sp>
  <sp who=Donald> <l part=F id=D>... in one dull line.</l>
    <p><stage>To Dewey</> Would you get your timing right for
    once in your life, you nitwit!</p>
    </sp>
 
But then, you begin by saying you have found a metrically INCOMPLETE
line divided among four speakers.  If you mean that even after putting
all four fragments together, the line is not complete, e.g. because
the fourth speaker doesn't actually finish, then I'd be inclined to
tag the fourth fragment as <L part=M>, because it is metrically medial,
even though it's the last fragment present.  The documentation says
the PART attribute refers to metrical completeness, not typographic
completeness.  So our example might be:
 
  <sp who=Hughie> <l part=I>And ten ...</l></sp>
  <sp who=Louie>  <l part=M>... low words ...</l></sp>
  <sp who=Dewey>  <l part=M>... oft creep ...</l></sp>
  <sp who=Donald> <l part=M>... in one dull --</l>
    <p><stage>To Dewey</> Would you sing on pitch for a change?</p>
    </sp>
 
Some might prefer to tag Donald's line <L part=F>, though, on the
grounds that it's the end of what we have.  I think PART is better
interpreted on strictly metrical grounds, but it's kind of a fine point
and I'm sure other views than mine are possible.
 
 
I hope this helps a bit.
 
-C. M. Sperberg-McQueen
 ACH / ACL / ALLC Text Encoding Initiative
 University of Illinois at Chicago