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Peter Flynn responds to Harry Gaylord:
>   This is an interesting question. The linking r  is found in situations
>   such as British Received Pronunciation where some r's are pronounced
>   sometimes. If the word "Richter" is followed by "scale", its final r
>   is not pronounced, but if it is followed by "and", it is pronounced.
>   Since IPA transcribes actual speech, there is no IPA symbol for it.
>
>This seems to be a contradiction. If the r is actually voiced, surely
>the IPA is supposed to be able to represent it?
 
    Here's the solution to the conundrum. When the phonem [r] is actaully
pronounced, it is represented in IPA by an appropriate symbol, depending on
the dialect of the speaker. If it is not pronounced, then it is not
written.
    Within English (RP) phonology, it's handy to have a symbol for the
phoneme [r] that is realized sometimes as /r/ and sometimes as // (nothing
at all). IPA represents phones, and so is more strictly limited to the
auditory.
 
 
   -- David Durand