Print

Print


Gregory Murphy writes:
 
   Jim Clark, CEO of Netscape, recently (10/26) gave a talk here at
   Princeton University about the "future of the Web."  Mr. Clark took
   great pains to differentiate his company and its flagship product,
   Netscape navigator, from his rival and its latest browser juggernaut.
   Unlike Microsoft, he intoned again and again, Netscape is commited to
   the idea of "open standards" - not just because they are better for
 
I think a wry smile is in order at this point. If this commitment is
true, it marks a major departure from past Netscape policy. In Mr
Clark's speech at CERN earlier this year, when made it clear that he
considered standards were something to be formed by companies to give
them a competitive advantage, not something to be discussed publicly,
let alone decided publicly.
 
Now please re-read that paragraph.
 
   Engineering Task Force) in these matters.  Mr. Clark had his answer
   ready:  "in the real world, standards don't make money; _money_ drives
   standards."  He went on to explain that Netscape had better things to do
   than twittle its corporate thumbs while the IETF debated the merits of
   this or that extension to this or that protocol.
 
That's more like the Netscape we know and love^H^H^H^H
 
   A short while later I asked Mr. Clark if, given his impression of the
   intractability of the IETF and his commitment to open standards, it
   might not be easier to move in the direction of support for multiple,
   extensible flavors of HTML, and any other document format; to move, in
   other words, towards full support of SGML.  "I'm sorry," he replied, "I
   don't know what that is.  You'll have to ask Marc."
 
Unfortunately Marc doesn't know either, but he has at least heard of it.
 
///Peter, member of the former IETF Working Group on HTML.