Print

Print


On Sep 4,  5:29pm, Joe Clark wrote:
> Subject: SGML for access rejoinder
> >(2) This is hardly an appropriate forum to take cheap shots at people
> >doing serious research involving antiquarian (or other) manuscripts!
> >
> >Liam Quin, SoftQuad Inc
>
> As I explained to Liam privately, those interested in antiquarian
> manuscripts can go on doing their thing and I won't stand in their
> way. However, in the computer industry there is a bias against
> features useful to the real world. How many people *need* JavaScript?
> And think of what Xerox PARC spends its time doodling away at. This
> bias is particularly true in the realm of disability issues: Try using
> QuickTime VR if you're blind.
 
Quicktime VR might have some promise if you're deaf, however -- an
English to ASL dictionary on line?
 
>
> Captioning, audio description, subtitling, and dubbing are at work
> worldwide, make money, and are barely computerized. SGML will be
> helpful in increasing the interoperability of all four media in all
> their forms worldwide and may well earn a fair bit of money for
> companies creating SGMLforAccess-compliant software-- unless, of
> course, TIPSTER or something else seems more appropriate, or TIPSTER
> experts take more of an interest in this underserved area.
>
 
Joe: please don't take our silence to mean we are not interested,
impressed, or do not stand ready to help when we feel we are able to. In
the beginning of any development process, we work by playing: most of us
aren't in it, or aren't only in it, for the money -- rather, we are
hoping to serve others by working on something we love. (Or that's the
case for me, anyway, and seems to be the case for you.) Naturally that
opens us to the criticism that we are doing something useless; strictly
speaking this may even be true: but unpredictably something useful _and_
revolutionary may emerge from such creativity -- which is not so much
aimless as it is driven by a particular, private passion.
 
If you're feeling solitary, that's what comes from being ahead of the
rest.  Knowing next to nothing of your field, I wish you the best -- and
I'm sure that as you keep working to build your prototypes, you'll find
developers who will share your vision.
 
Thanks for speaking up, and please don't disappear!
 
Wendell Piez
Center for Electronic Texts in the Humanities
Rutgers and Princeton Universities
[log in to unmask]
 
>
>                                         Joe Clark
>                                     [log in to unmask]
>                              <http://www.hookup.net/~joeclark>
>-- End of excerpt from Joe Clark