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>I agree with the usefulness of writing Hebrew in ISO 8859-8. There is one
>problem: as yet there is no SGML/TEI software which can appropriately
>reverse the character stream to get correct R-T-L Hebrew on screen or for
>other normal Hebrew directionality for searching, etc.
 
Good point.  I had considered only the presentational issues, which
might be addressed by a hack.  Clearly, searching and such demand
something considerably beyond a hack.  Besides, not everybody likes to
hack.  I checked out the information on FrameMaker at Adobe before
posting, and was surprised to see no mention of Hebrew, otherwise that
might have been an answer.  Similarly, Nisus Writer, a good
multi-lingual editor for the Mac -- which does do Hebrew and HTML --
makes no reference to SGML, and even honestly admits of its HTML
capabilities "However, you will notice that users of Hebrew, Arabic, and
Cyrillic are (so far) out of luck."   And I couldn't adequately check
out Timelux, which does a Unicode-based SGML editor for the PC, because
their Web server (www.timelux.lu) is not accepting connections.
(Although I could get to them by bus, I suppose:  they're only 5 km
away.)  I have to admit that I didn't check out either WordPerfect or
Microsoft Word, although both support Hebrew, and both claim
SGML support.  Although, of course, any word processor is going to hold
data in a proprietary format, and is likely to be unable to export
documents containing more than one writing system in a usable format for
free information exchange.
 
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Dominic Dunlop