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Raymond Brown respondis:

> And limiting the choice to Ido & Novial is very narrow, to say the least.
> Why hark back to languages the early years of this century?  The younger of
> the two, Novial, is now approaching 70.  Let's at least look _ahead_ to the
> comming 3rd millennium!

And what exactly will that bring that new age bring that we don't
already have?
We seem to hear a lot of talk about this panacea of a Global IAL,
but we never see any examples of such a thing.  As Jespersen said,
everything should hang together in an IAL.  I would interpret that
as meaning that it should be reasonably homogeneous.  Imagine the
alternative: say, for instance, we take the suffix -al from Euro
languages.  Then we take a whole load of substantives from Malay
or Cantonese or Japanese.  Who on earth is going to recognize the
resulting derived forms?  In short, I would imagine that the sort of
level of autonomous word-building we would desire, along with an
almost certainly continental Euro orthography, would preclude many
non-Euro forms anyway.
[By the way, the people of this list probably didn't know that Ido
 "ka" actually comes from Sanskrit.]

James Chandler.