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In many cases the Interlingua forms are _less_ regular even than English. I
have, for example, seen in Interlingua posts the verb "seliger." At first,
all that came to mind was a German adjective ("selig," meaning "blessed,"
takes an -er endind in the masc. sing. strong form) which obviously is a
false friend. My Latin was, however, good enough to realize that -lig- in
the infinitive stem corresponds to -lect- in the participial stem. But here
Emg. (and French too, IIRC) uses the participial stem throughout!


Languages vary in their handling here. English uses "select/selection."
Spanish uses "seleccionar/seleccione." Neither is typical of what these
languages do with this type of words. Jespersen's criterion (not complied
with 100%, but where he departed from it, we have often restored this pattern)
was that if an -ion/-ive form is internationally available it was used, and
the basic verb back-formed from it. Thus we have selekte(r)/selektione/
selektiv[i] (the -i on adjectives is optional when no possibility exists for
error. As no other part of speech can bear a -v ending, this is one such case).

                                Bruce R. Gilson
                                email: [log in to unmask] or [log in to unmask]
                                IRC: EZ-as-pi
                                WWW: http://www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/3141
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