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On Fri, 19 Dec 1997, Todd Moody wrote (small excerpt):

> Anyway, redundancy aside, this is another reason why I find the
> inflected accusative less restrictive than fixed word order.

    Once I was reading a fantasy novel in which one character's
supposedly archaic speech (among the languages of this fictional world)
was represented as idiosyncratic English.  A number of the sentences
were VSO.  In many instances, either S or O or both were third person
pronouns, which in English have distinct forms, but some sentences used
nouns for both both S and O, and they were fully intelligible (if a bit
strange, which they were supposed to be) without any morpheme
accusative.  So it does not always seem to be necessary even in
utterances with "disturbed" word order.  And, as is well known,
Esperanto uses the -n formant for more than just S/O discrimination, so
that it does duty (and somewhat perplexingly) as more than just an
accusative marker.

Paul                             <[log in to unmask]>
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