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Je 12:40 atm 12/31/97 -0500, Jay BOWKS skribis:

>>By the way, I forgot to note that if Che Guevara ever actually
>said
>>"Interlingua o muerte", as Allan quoted, it's pretty obvious in
>retrospect
>>which of the two turned out to appeal more to him... ;<)
>>
>
>:-))) Morbid but funny! BTW Interlingua is not connected
>in anyway with any political movements, otherwise I would
>decline involvement. But as it is UMI is quite neutral as
>pertains religious or political matters. :-)
>
As a language, they're all pretty neutral, including English, Russian and
Chinese. As a movement, on the other hand, you only know that you've
started arriving when somebody feels that you're on the wrong side of the
fence (politically or religiously) and decides to shut you down, more or
less permanently. This first happened to Esperanto in 1895, when the
Romanov government banned the circulation of _La Esperantisto_ inside the
empire and forbade the publication of material in Esperanto. I don't think
any of those directly involved were particularly appreciative of the honor
being done them, however. If it never happens to Interlingua, somewhere,
for some reason, Interlingua as a movement is in trouble.

UEA (Universala Esperanto-Asocio) also touts its political neutrality. But
it is one of the NROs that works with UNESCO, something that I am sure my
own government doesn't (at least at this time) consider a particularly
neutral stance. Jesse Helms certainly wouldn't.

-- Don HARLOW
http://www.webcom.com/~donh/
(English version: http://www.webcom.com/~donh/dona.html)