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Paul Bartlett wrote:
>I supposed that this is more or less what was
>meant. However, I am of the opinion (or
>school) that the grammar of a conIAL needs to
>be specified somewhere, and not just assumed.
>Those who have different native language
>habits might otherwise put things together in
>other orders from different assumptions.
>This has been one of my beefs with Glosa. The
>principals seem to refuse to publish a grammar,
>relying instead on paradigmatic sentences.
>Unfortunately, these paradigmatic sentences are
>presented divorced from a context, so
>ambiguities in usage remain. It is true that
>children do not (usally, anyway) learn their
>native languages out of a grammar textbook.
>But neither do they learn them in a context-free
>situation with no feedback, as is the case with
>bare paradigmatic sentences, as in the Glosa
>approach.
 
Kjell R writes:
This seams to be the method of the Teach Yourself books. They never give
you a whole text but sentences without a context. I like context when I
learn languages.
 
Bob writes:
> I have a "new" used copy of the 1943 Interglossa. Hogben seems to me
>quite thorough in explaining Interglossa. I have not seen any of the Glosa
>publications, except some basic info on the net, so I can't speak to what
>they have published in their other works.
>
>However, I might mention, Hogben mentions Speedwords, surprisingly, in the
>1943 book Interglossa. I say surprisingly because Speedwords first text
>book says it was also published in 1943. Anyway, Hogben knew of Speedwords
>and again spoke highly of it and called it "ingenious" as have others.
 
And then follows 35 lines of pangegyrics about Speedwords. It is the
difference between languages like Esperanto, Ido and Speedwords on the one
hand and Interlingua and Novial on the other. The latter can be read by
persons versed in one or more of the great Western languages. That means
that you don't have to write long blocks of text about them. This is not
necessary until you have to convince monoglot Scandinavians, Finns and
Russians (to mention but a few examples). Those of them who have the
necessary linguistic base - and there is more of them as one might think -
can read the languages, not the information about them.
 
I am now copying a Novial text. I can understand everything in it, although
I have not studied Novial too intensively.
 
 
 
I wonder if Speedwords could not be used in the translation and
interpreting business? Any ideas?
 
 
Kjell [log in to unmask]
Kjell Rehnstroem
Vaenortsgatan 87
S-752 64  UPPSALA
Suedia - Sweden