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On Tue, 27 Jan 1998 23:28:41 +0200, Allan Kiviaho
<[log in to unmask]> wrote:
 
 
>                [Allan 980127]
>Almost all Europeans think that Italian and Spanish are very beautiful
>languages. I gladly admit that their soundings are more beautiful than
 
 
Oh, thanks. We spanish people aren't aquainted of that. And for us,
Spanish is not beautiful nor ugly. As you can supose, it is simply
neutral for us.
 
 
>                [Allan 980127]
>The point is that very many Europeans detest strongly the idea that an
>external language, English, would take hegemony in Europe. Look the
>movement presided by Otto von Habsburg, for instance.=20
 
Who is Otto von Habsburg?
 
>    It is very important to get a common language to the EU. And let it
>not be English. We do not need a language where "i" is "ee" and "u" is
>"oo". We do not like the idea listening to operas being sung in English,
>which is, according to a violinist in the Helsinki City Symphony
>Orchestra, a farce because one cannot comprehend the texts due to the
>blurred pronunciation of tha lingo.=20
 
I think English is more adequate for rock music than for opera,
surely. In fact, I like English for rock, but I supose it's just a
matter of custom.
 
Let's sing in Italian - and
>Interlinguan ...=20
 
Well, I must say that Italian (though it sounds well) is not a very
suitable language for music. It has very few acute words (that is,
words stressed on last sylable) which are a need on a lot of musical
phrases' endings. On the other hand, I think that arts would be go on
being expressed on national languages primarly, though it would appear
(of course) an arising auxlang literature/music.
 
 
>                [Allan 980117]
>>I think that every European should have a full fluency
>>in at least three languages: The native language of
>>the corresponding country, Interlingua and English.
 
I think that every European should have a full fluency
in at least two languages: The native language of
the corresponding country, auxlang (whichever it be), and in some
cases the language of the region in which they live (for example, in
northwest of Spain, where I live, there is a regional language called
Galician, with a Spanish-Portuguese look, and it is spoken as well as
Spanish here).
On third (or fourth) place, English should also be spoken by every
Europeans, but I think that in this case it wouldn't have to be
fluently.
 
>                [Allan 980127]
>For the simple reason that Interlingua is - as I believe - the best
>choice for the common language for Europe. It is also the best candidate
>for being accepted in all countries in Europe. The Romance countries
 
Well, I cannot agree with you here. I think the best choice for Europe
would be an easy to use actively language (not only passively), and at
this respect I think that Interlingua is for non-poliglot
north-europeans and east-europeans a hardly overrulable lang.
 
AND, if we are going to adopt an auxiliary language, which undoubtly
would become the world auxiliary language later, we ought to think
about its easyness for non-occidentals. In this respect, I think that
schematic languages (Ido, Eo) are the only ones overrulable for the
majority of Asian and African people. Probably, Interlingua would be
for them almost as difficult as English. At least, you must accept
that I-a is a very unneutral language outside Occident.
 
>    This is no mere phantasy. In a recent voting in Europarliament some
>17-18 % of the MP's already voted FOR an auxlang. It was for Esperanto,
>because it was the only auxlang presented to them.=20
 
Really? I wasn't acquainted of any for-auxlang votation on the
european parlamient. Could you enlarge this information?
 
>    But James and other Gentlemen in the AUXLANG group! Let's think
>about a popular referendum for an auxlang in all countries in Europe.
>Which will the peoples vote for? For a constructed language like
>Esperanto with its ugly diacritic signs and still uglier "kaj", "jes",
>-aj, -ajn, -oj, -ojn etc?=20
 
Well, why not Ido, then?
 
Or for a natural language, Interlingua, which
>sounds and tastes Latin and Romance, like Italian or Spanish but which
 
I accept that Interlingua would have more posibilities than any other
auxlang in a popular referendum, but it's obvious that that doesn't
make it the "best suitable auxlang for Europe". In fact, I-a is not
the prefered auxlang by people who knows auxlangs (that is
auxlangers).
 
 
>sounds still more beautiful than Italian and Spanish becaused it is
>purged from the peculiarities of those natlangs, as, for example, the
>Spanish "lisping" sounds.=20
 
Hey, whats the matter with our lisping sounds? ;-)=20
They also exist in English (as th in thousand, thick, etc).
Well, I know they are not too popular in other languages, but in fact,
the most of Spanish-speaking people (that is south-american) does use
"s" sound instead of "th" sound wherever it is.
 
By the way, I have to say that for me (as a spanish man), Interlingua
has an aspect which reminds a kind of Spanish deformation with some of
Italian and French.=20
 
>                [Allan 980127]
>Hah, after studying some 10 years English language and literature my
>daughter and her boy-friend were extremely sceptical at my advocating
>the
>Interlingua.=20
 
It'd became "10 years of work for nothing", wouldn't it?=20
 
But, appart of them, is it not a bit strange that there is so little
people interested on the auxlang solution?
 
 
>                SUMMARY
>Perhaps it is time to cease plodding with various odd conlangs and unite
>the efforts for introducing Interlingua or a still more latinized
>Interlingua as a common auxlang in Europe. The time is ripe just now
>when a new group of countries are going to join the EU and the Babel of
>languages in EU is becoming more and more messy! What's the target of
>our actions? The major political parties in the member countries of the
>EU! There is the real power.=20
 
Maybe you're right. But perhaps you should abandon your partisan
actitude with I-a and remember that we are to fight out there for an
auxlang adoption, not for our personal favourite auxlang. Perhaps I
won't convince you that Ido is better than I-a, nor viceversa, but we
should not forget we are on the same party.
 
 
 
Saludos,
Marcos