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Je 12:02 ptm 1/31/98 +0200, Allan KIVIAHO skribis:
 
[Ha, ha! THIS time I checked the header and fixed it even before writing
this reply!]
 
>"Motherhood and Wienerschnitzel"
>
>>        [Allan Kiviaho 980128]
>>As you can see, the percentage of MP's at the Europarliament favorable
>>for Esperanto was 18.53 %. I don't have the URL of the web-site but
>>you can certainly easily find it with Altavista. Of the Finns Reino
>>Paasilinna is a former general dicector of the Finnish Broadcasting
>>Company and Astrid Thors is an eminent personality at the Swedish
>>People's Party of Finland. Mr. Paasilinna's both brothers are very
>>famous writers.
>>
>[Follows list of 116 MPs]
>
>          [Donald J. HARLOW <[log in to unmask]> 980128]
>Allan, I think you are looking at a list of current Europarliamentarians
>who have, at one time or another, expressed themselves as being
>favorable
>to Esperanto, presumably in writing. This does not represent any kind of
>actual vote in the parliament, to the best of my knowledge. I do not
>expect this support to translate itself into any kind of vote in the
>foreseeable future, either, since supporting Esperanto (or any other
>planned language) lies politically somewhere between supporting
>motherhood and wienerschnitzel on the one hand and absolute stark
>staring madness on the other.
>
>          [Allan Kiviaho 980131]
>Don, I think there is more in it than Wienerschnitzel (but less than
>motherhood, which is the most important thing of humanity, I believe).
>Please read my salvo of messages AUXLANG AT EUROPARLIAMENT - I ... and
>decide then.
>
"Motherhood and weinerschnitzel" -- just a take-off on the American
expression (used to describe what politicians are usually willing to
support without equivocation) "motherhood and apple pie".
 
>May be "VOTING" is not the best word, but the "Concise English
>Dictionary"
>by Cassell says:
>vote - n. a formal expression of opinion, will or choice, in regard to
>the election of a candidate, the passing or rejection of a resolution,
>law etc., usually signified by voice, gesture, ballot; anything by which
>it is expressed, as a ballot, ticket etc.; that which is voted, as a
>grant of money; the aggregate votes of a party etc.; the right to vote,
>the suffrage.
>v.i. to give one's vote; to express one's approval (for).
>v.t. to give one's vote for; to enact, resolve, ratify, or grant by a
>majority of
>votes;
>(coll.) to declare by general consent.
>>From Latin votum, wish, vow
>
>" to express one's approval (for)", that's it., or "to declare by
>general consent".
>
In English, when you see the word "vote", you primarily assume that a group
of people have formally expressed their support or opposition to a certain
matter. Secondarily, you may suppose that the expression was informal but
fairly complete; hence it might be said that the Esperantists of 1907 voted
"with their feet" on the question of Ido (though no formal poll was ever
taken, nor could be). But in any case, a vote requires expressions both of
approval and disapproval, to completion or at least a result satisfactory
to one side or another. Private expressions of support by 116
Europarliamentarians do not satisfy this requirement; while some of the
others have, I suppose, expressed opposition, most have not responded
either way. So the requirements for a "vote" have not been (and probably
won't be) satisfied, and, at least in English, no "vote" has been held,
though perhaps it can be said that some have "cast their votes".
 
-- Don HARLOW
http://www.webcom.com/~donh/
(English version: http://www.webcom.com/~donh/dona.html)