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I share the experience of some in the group that PO Versed more often
than not does cause "paradoxical" agitation rather than controlled
sedation. Our radiologists use IV Nembutal though none of us from the ED
have used it.
 
 Propofol is fast emerging as a non barbiturate non benzodiazepine
sedative-hypnotic outside of the OR setting. The ultra short action
gives it an edge over Nembutal but requires controlled infusion. I
speculate that the hypotension & respiratory depression with propofol
may be less than its barbiturate counterpart. Involuntary movements &
burning at the site of injection are a frequent issue with propofol. But
I like the ability to titrate our infusion to match needs & its action
is lost within minutes of termination of the infusion.
 
Jay Pershad
 
        -----Original Message-----
        From:   Marianne B. Sutton [SMTP:[log in to unmask]]
        I work in a Community Hospital in Massachussets we use versed
for
        conscious sedation frequently and had a few questions.
 
        What are people doing when sedation for a CT with versed fails?
        Are non-anesthesiologists using propofol (diprivan)?
        Do you give versed to children who have a full stomach?  If now
how long
        do you require them to be NPO?
 
 
 
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