Print

Print


>At 22:28 22/2/98, Kjell Rehnstr=F6m wrote:
>.....
>>None of us is unique in this case. But my point is not that no national
>>languages are taught voluntarily,
>
>Maybe not in Sweden; but there's been a long tradition of _voluntary_
>teaching & learning of natlangs in the UK in "evening classes".  Before the
>constraints of the national curriculum of the 1980s, _voluntary_ teaching &
>learning of natlangs was not unknown in schools either.
>
My point was that in our  schools we learn foreign languages, not because
we want to but because they are on the curriculum. So they are compulsory.
Of course national languages are studied on a voluntary basis as well, I
know, but is there any compulsory instruction of esperanto going on, do you
think?
 
What I mean to say is that the artificial languages have intirely been
spread through voluntary studying.
 
 
>Yes, yes, but the wars accompanying the break-up of Yugoslavia were
>confined.  They did not spill over and engulf the rest of the Balkans,
>still less the rest of the world as a certain incident in Sarajevo did in
>1914.
>
>>An international language is not only for those who can go to one of the
>>big countries to brush upp his language there - like all those who go to
>>the UK on combined holiday and language-studying trips.
>
>I'm sorry - I don't see the relevance of this to your original letter.  Has
>anyone on AUXLANG list argued against an IAL?
>
>Some of us just don't like "group advantage" being planned into an conIAL.
>
It has, if you see English as an international language as well, which it
is. The great advantage with English is that you have millions upon
millions of native speakers as your teachers and language arbitrators. The
elites in varoius societies can make use of that and send their kids to
such schools where they will have better English instruction than
elsewhere. Good for them, but what I want from a constructed language is
that it gives their users a means of communication AND a help in learning
other necessary languages.
 
A general use of Interlingua might give better room for studying Chinese or
Japanese which are more and more important. And it will give Chinese and
Japanese speakers a catapult start into western languages.
 
The idea of an international language equally easy for all is an
impossibility and therefore something that politician would love - because
they would never have to show their cards. Cfr the fawning on Classical
Latin in Europe.
 
- -- -
Written in Euroswenglish without the slightest attempt at irony and all
persons and places are babies of my own imagination and resemblances with
really existing persons or happenings, if any, are purely coincidental. :-)
 
 
Kjell [log in to unmask]
Kjell Rehnstroem
Vaenortsgatan 87
S-752 64  UPPSALA
Suedia - Sweden