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E Alcott scripted:
 
> i would say that ido borrows from esperanto, but not the other way around.
 
Not so.  Esp-ists have taken up (officially or not) a number of words and
suffixes from Ido.
 
> there were so many changes made to esperanto to form ido that ido is only
> slightly readable to an esperantist (at least to me)
 
Perhaps.  But if your mother-tongue is European, much of the Ido vocabulary
will already be familiar to you.  Actually, I doubt Ido is so very
hard for Esp-ists.  The verb conjugation and POS endings (-o, -a, -e) are
the same, for a start.
 
> for example, the three new infinitive endings,
 
-ar is v. well known anyway.  -ir and -or follow the
-is/as/os/-inta/anta/onta pattern, and can be useful.
 
> new way to form plurals,
 
Familiar from I and Rom, and not nearly so heavy nor ubiquitous as the
Esp -j.
 
> new prefixes, and
> introduction of new letters with variable pronunciation (like x= egs, eks,
> etc.)  i'm relatively new on this list, so forgive me when i ask, does
> anyone here speak ido?  if you do, can u understand esperanto (if you
> haven't studied it)  thanks
 
I speak Ido.  I have a more basic understanding of Esp.  I find it
reasonably easy to switch between the two.  They are probably closer than
Span. and Ital., for example.
 
> e. alcott
> Ne estu sola en la mondo, Lernu Esperanton!
 
Or you could always take a look at Ido or Novial ...
 
James Chandler
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