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To some degree it really doesn't matter whether a doctor is trained in
pediatrics or emergency medicine and then performs in a general ED, the real
issue is whetheror not you can get privelages to practice in such a setting
with your credentials..What happens in a court is a determination as to
whether or not your practice met the standard of care..The standard one is
held to might be determined by expert witness from the field of medicine you
are not trained in..So the question as I see it is,, 1) are you confident
enough that with your training and experience that you can provide the care
your patients will need, 2) if an adverse outcome occurs, do you feel that
your practice will stand the scrutiny by experts from the fields of medicne
you crossed into? 3) How comfortable are you with the judgement of the
credentialling bodies, ie, will they take any warm body or ar they really
careful about who they allow to practice..Seems to me the more meticulous the
credentialing body is, the more solace you might take in practicing
there..knowing you passed their muster..
Of course what happens in court is very unpredictable and I dont think one
should temper their practice by a fear of what a jury might or might not do.
 
Remember malpractice is a tort and as such there are specific key elements
that must have occurred for a plaintiff to be successful
 
1, duty---breach of that duty
2. negligent action
3. harm  as a result of that negligent action
4. damages
 
Hpoe this information was what you wre looking for..
 
MIH
Memphis
 
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