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Bruce wrote:
>> Most of the Occidentalists, of course, went over to the very similar Inte=
r-
>> lingua. It is not the first time, of course, that I found someone who lik=
ed
>> Occ and did not like Interlingua. I met one on IRC, in the #conlang chann=
el,
>> which seems again to have died after a brief revival. I'd be interested,
>>since
>> to me the languages seem so close, in the reasons why some people might
>>prefer
>> Occidental to Interlingua.
 
Bob:
>Might be possibly that I have eight volumes of reading material in the
>actual language,
>versus seeing the bits and pieces of it and others on the web. I looked
>through the Gode
>IALA dictionary, and frankly, was not moved by what I saw. i.e. It did not
>peak my interest.
>Occidental did and does. Don't know why, but when I look at Interlingua my
>mind says, I have
>English why do I need romance endings on my English? With Occidental, I
>still see  that, but
>for some reason I like it better. Go figure.Bob
 
The first time I heard about Occidental was in the late fifties. At that
time I new Esperanto and I found I could read Occidental. It was
interesting and it sounded fine when you tried to read it aloud. For some
years I carried a little promotional text in my wallet. It went something
like: In li cit=E1 il es un grandi congress. Mult autos ... (and the rest ha=
s
slipped out of my memory). But there did not seam to be any movement in
Sweden and I never did anything more of it.
 
Then starting to study Interlingua I had a subscription of Rik Berger's
Revista de Interlingua where he printed copies of old issues of Cosmoglotta
and other publications. As you know he had begun as an enthusiastic
Esperantist who then went over to Ido and then Occidental and finally
Interlingua. If I recall correctly he was an arts teacher and a very
interesting person. So reading his Revista I consumed huge portions of
occidental as well. But I did not activize the language.
 
Then some years ago I saw mentions of some people wanting to resurrect
Occidental. I thought this could be interesting and took some issuces of
the Cosmoglotta from the University library (as I told you in an earlier
posting).
 
If you learn Occidental I will understand you perfectly. The differences
between the to languages is about the same as between Swedish and
Norwegian. No problem.
 
I think one has to bear in mind that the Interlingua - English dictionary
was intended both as a dictionary of a language that could be used, as a
registration of the common vocabulary - according to certain criteria - and
as a tool for future constructors of an international auxiliary language.
 
As to what Bob said about him having English and not needing e Romancified
version of said language, perhaps two things can be said:
1. I can understand him.
 
2. Interlingua is NOT English without the Germanic part, it is much more
international. Just to quote some examples: the Interlingua _control_ and
_actual_ are not equivalents to the English words!
 
With more non-native speakers of English on this list in active discussion
much of these biases in the discussion could probably be checked.
 
A revival of Occidental might have a good dialectic influence. It could be
worth trying.
 
I wonder whether it was not sociological and political factors that sanc
Occidental.
 
A revider!
 
 
 
 
Kjell [log in to unmask]
Kjell Rehnstroem
Vaenortsgatan 87
S-752 64  UPPSALA
Suedia - Sweden