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Je 08:28 ptm 5/1/98 -0400, Paul O. BARTLETT skribis:
 
>On Fri, 1 May 1998, Ken Caviness wrote (little excerpt):
>
>> But, yes, I prize word-building!
>
>    I have come to have some hesitations about conIALs which are
>supposedly so big on word-building.  Some built-up words can be so
>complicated, with so many components, that they become puzzles to
>be solved rather than verbal implements to be used.  I suspect that
>some of these complexes nearly have to be learned and used as wholes,
>in which case some of the touted benefit of word-building is lost.
>Moreover, there may be tendencies of "experienced" users to employ
>components in ever new (and possibly more bizarre) ways which can
>leave learners scratching their heads and can undermine some of the
>supposed "ease of learning" for which the language is touted.
>
Couple of interesting points here:
 
(1) There _is_ such a temptation for some people, including myself; but I
generally satisfy it in class, using such sesquipedalian polysyllables as
demonstrations to students of how the system works, with the firmly
expressed caveat that in practice they will almost never encounter anything
in Esperanto containing more than (a) two conjoined roots or (b) one root
with at most one prefix and one or two suffixes (and the largest of these
are very rare indeed).
 
Of course, "malsanulinejegpurigistarestraranino" _is_ a perfectly good
Esperanto word, and one can never be absolutely certain that they won't run
into it in a newspaper story or on a newsnote from Polish Radio Warsaw or
something. Just like the common English term
"antidisestablishmentarianism"...;<)
 
(2) By the time you are fluent enough to converse freely in Esperanto, you
_have_ memorized all the compound words that you generally use -- _nobody_,
after some use, creates a word anew every time they have to use it; that
would lead to incredibly slow and tedious conversations. This might explain
why, as I posted earlier, nobody seems to feel any need to add "mikra" &c
to their vocabularies -- "malgranda" &c are already such an integral part.
So for the most part more experienced Esperanto speakers have _less_ of a
need to compound words; they do so only on the fringes of their vocabulary.
Compounding is more appropriate for less experienced speakers, for whom the
vocabulary is _all_ fringes.
 
 
-- Don HARLOW
http://www.webcom.com/~donh/
(English version: http://www.webcom.com/~donh/dona.html)