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Je 11:32 atm 4/30/98 -0700, Chris BURD skribis:
>At 05:39 PM 30 04 98 +0100, James Chandler wrote:
>>Kjell [iso-8859-1] Rehnstr=F6m scripted:
>>
>>> Il es triste leger del ric general francese qui offere moneta al povre
>>> ophtalmologo pro que ille lassa su practica in le Ghetto Varsovian pro
>>> mover con tote le familia a Brussela o Paris pro esser plus accessibile.
>>>=20
>>> Isto occurreva in 1906 o 7. Zamenhof nasceva in 1859. In le etate de 48
>>> annos on voleva que Zamenhof move a un altere pais con tote su familia.
>>> Isto non es como mover se de Nove York a San Francisco. On move in un
>>> altere mundo con altere linguas.... a un existentia multo insecur.=20
>>
>>Insecure???  He would have had 250,000 FFr under his belt...  That was
>>quite a pension in those days.
>
>Let's see, it was 8 francs to the dollar in those fixed-exchange-rate days,
>so that's $31,250. Multiply by ten to account for inflation and you've got
>$312,500, which would yield an income of about $15,000-$20,000 a year. Not
>much by today's standards, but solidly middle-class back then.
>
Well, we can skip over the fact that, as Julian (I believe) pointed out
(not to mention Zamenhof himself) he would _not_ have had 250,000 FFr under
his belt, but would have received it in dribs and drabs, so long as he did
what he was ordered to do, so investment would have been impossible at=
 best...
 
Also, you multiply by ten to account for inflation ... but then you take
the resulting interest and move it back to before inflation to show how
well-off Zamenhof would have been. There's something I don't get in that
arithmetic...
 
Z. would have received $1500-$2000 a year, by your calculations. As I
remember, that's the equivalent of 300-400 pounds a year at the rate of
exchange in 1906 (or was the pound even higher then?). If I remember my
Jane Austen correctly, that was more or less the amount that a genteel lady
of no great demands willing to put up in a small country cottage and
support minimal family or retainers could have expected to live on in
England -- almost a hundred years of inflation earlier. No great shakes as
a pension, IMHO.
 
 
-- Don HARLOW
http://www.webcom.com/~donh/
(English version: http://www.webcom.com/~donh/dona.html)