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> As an example, back in the seventies, some Chinese Esperantist took
> the name of a "hit" song, which was in English "officially" "The East
> Is Red", and made it in Esperanto "officially" "Ruxas la Oriento" -- a
> much more evocative expression than the English one.
 
I think that this is the key point.  It's not that "belas" has a meaning
specifically different from "estas bela"; it is just the because it is
unusual "belas" is marked in some ill-defined way and that makes it more
expressive, more evocative.
 
This is part of the "power and richness" of Esperanto, something dear to
most Esperantists hearts, why we tend to "love" the language in a way
that may strike many as inappropriate.
 
Of course, such subtleties are difficult for beginners, but that would
be true of any language that has subtleties.  A language without such
subtleties would be rather dull, but more to the point, I suspect that
they will arise in _any_ language that has a community of speakers.
 
And if a beginner understands "Rughas la Oriento" as "La Oriento estas
Rugha" he has lost something, but not something critically important.
 
-- jP --