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Quoth James Chandler:
> Don Blaheta scripted:
> > :)  I remain convinced that Star Trek went a long way towards
> > legitimizing the split infinitive, more power to them.
>
> How did they do that?  (Not a fan myself.)
 
The intro to the original series ended with the phrase "to boldly go
where no man has gone before".  The next generation series intro ended
with the same phrase (except "no one").  Scads of spoofs and parodies
and jokes have used variations on this construction (the most famous
probably being "to boldly split infinitives..." :)
 
> > I don't know if you noticed, but all the examples you gave have a short
> > vowel before the F, whereas the F->V rule applies more to the long
> > vowels.  And I don't think it was Tolkien that introduced the V
> > spelling--Disney's movie is entitled "Snow White and the Seven Dwarves",
> > isn't it?
>
> I don't know about that.  But is there a linguistic law that unvoiced
> consonants tend to get voiced after long vowels?  I actually remember
> reading something along those lines, in Language, I think.  But I can't be
> certain.  If there is such a law, of course, it is possible we won't move
> towards "scarfs, dwarfs".  It may also be possible that "dwarves" was
> coined on analogy with "wharves".
 
Or "elves".  I'm not sure about the linguistic law, but I know that the
F->V thing in English only applies after long(ish) vowels.
 
--
-=-Don [log in to unmask]<http://www.cs.brown.edu/~dpb/>-=-
"Me non kreda ke les pove pose lo en mental hospitale.  Tamen si lo vud
es ja inu, me non kreda ke les vud permise lo extru."