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James Chandler scribeva:
 
> (...) As we all know (I think) by now, whereas in
> Esperanto it is permitted to change at will the POS ending of a word to=
 
> derive a new word, in Ido such swaps are only permitted in certain case=
s
> and the meaning of the resulting word is always precisely determined.  =
If
> you want to go from one POS to another and get a word with a different
> meaning as the result, you are required to use an affix.
> (...) In Ido,
> the meaning is "the (simple) act or state implied by the vb".  (...)
> But now, let's say I want the word for "snow" or "rain", meaning the
> substance that falls.  I look these up in an Ido dictionary, and find N=
IVO
> from NIVAR and PLUVO from PLUVAR.  But the substance is not an act or a=
 
> state, as we are all well aware.  So what else: NIVAJO, "that which
> snows"?  NIVURO, "product of snowing"?  Neither of those seems right
> either.  So Idists quitely use NIVO, as the most concise of the wrong
> options.
 
Io opina que hic [here] NIVO e PLUVO es le idea original, e le verbos NIV=
AR e
PLUVAR es derivate ab illos [from them]. Le parolas [words] NIVO e PLUVO
designa phenomenos, e NIVAR e PLUVAR indica le occurrentia de tal [such]
phenomenos.
 
> How about a "thought"?  This is not really an act or state, but the Ido=
 
> dictionaries give PENSO.  PENSAJO?  Maybe, but is "think" transitive?.
> PENSURO?  Not quite.  PENSATO?  By this stage most Idists are thoroughl=
y
> confused and just follow the dictionary.
 
Quanto a isto [as for this], io non cognosce [know] le suffixos de Ido, e=
rgo
[so] io non pote facer commentarios.--
   ENSJO*: EMERSON JOS=C9 SILVEIRA DA COSTA
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