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Having lurked for a while on this subject...
 
Last weekend I attended a youth soccer tournament where a child had a tooth
knocked out resulting in two teams and all parents on their hands and knees
searching for the lost tooth.  As I watched this unfold, this discussion had
new relevence.
 
Regarding having it available at events... what is the cost, where is it
purchased (and how) and what is the "life" of the product.  All tournaments
I attend have a small medical staff and all teams carry medical boxes.  It
seems to me having it at the events is a matter of upfront cost and shelf
life.  If the cost is small enough or the shelf life long enough, its a
doable thing.  If too expensive or if the life is too short it won't happen.
As an aside, why not have parents just keep it on their shelf next to the
bottle of Ipecac?
 
Also, in an environment with ALS within 5 minutes and an ED within 15-20,
does it really make a difference?  If the best place is "in the mouth" at
the ED, then why not have the ALS team do the same?
 
Sorry to intrude; however, as an EMS provider with two small children
playing sports my interest has been piqued.
 
Brandon
Chief, Hamel VFD
--
H. Brandon Guest              | [log in to unmask]
Siemens Power Systems Control | Siemens Power Trans. & Dist., LLC.
7225 Northland Drive          | Voice (612) 536-4529
Brooklyn Park, MN 55428-1540  | Fax   (612) 536-4214
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Brent King [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Friday, June 05, 1998 8:04 AM
To: Multiple recipients of list PED-EM-L
Subject: Re: information seeking
 
 
Save-a-Tooth contains Hank's solution which is, in theory, the ideal
preservation medium for a lost tooth. However, this stuff works best when
the tooth can be placed in the solution immediately. Save-a-Tooth should
be present at children's athletic events, etc. Once the child reaches the
ED, the best place to put the tooth while waiting for the dentist,is back
in the socket.
 
We have used charcoal flavored with cherry syrup and found it to be
somewhat more palatable than regular charcoal. We also cover the cup.
Palatability is not solely a function of taste. If something looks bad, it
is hard to eat it even if it tastes good.
 
BK
 
Brent R King, M.D.
St. Christopher's Hospital for Children
 
"... And on the pedestal these words appear:
'My name is Osymandias, King of Kings:
Look upon my works, ye Mighty and despair!'
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck..." PB Shelley
 
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For more information, send mail to [log in to unmask] with the message: info PED-EM-L
The URL for the PED-EM-L Web Page is:
  http://www.brown.edu/Administration/Emergency_Medicine/ped-em-l.html