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Rich,
I hope that my comments did not put any one off to using chicken legs.
They do simulate the feel of the IO insertion better than the manikins wich
have plastic bones.  I find a combination of chicken legs *and* a manikin
(with a flat tibial surface medially and a tibial tuberosity)  the best as
this combine the best feel of insertion (chicken leg), with correct
landmarks (manikin).
Michael Tunik, MD
 
>        Don't knock drumsticks, Mike.  They do an excellent job at
>simulating infant long bones despite the lack of appropriate landmarks,
>and just about *nobody* skeeves at knocking intraosseous needles into
>'em.  I ran through a PHTLS (PreHospital Trauma Life Support) course for
>the local EMT's a couple of years ago, and the IO needle training went
>like a charm with them damned Perdue Simulators.......
>                                        -- Rich Bartucci, D.O.
>> The chicken leg is the best simulation of an infants tibia for IO
>> placement, in terms of ease of insertion, thickness of cortex etc.  I
>> strongly believe that a manikin that has *correct lower leg anatomy
>> and landmarks* is a must.  ....a chicken leg that has no landmarks
>> and no flat bony surface.
 
>> For more information, send mail to [log in to unmask] with the
>> message: info PED-EM-L
>> The URL for the PED-EM-L Web Page is:
>>   http://www.brown.edu/Administration/Emergency_Medicine/ped-em-l.html
>>
>
>For more information, send mail to [log in to unmask] with the
message: info PED-EM-L
>The URL for the PED-EM-L Web Page is:
>  http://www.brown.edu/Administration/Emergency_Medicine/ped-em-l.html
>
>
Michael Tunik, MD
Associate Director
Pediatric Emergency Medicine
Bellevue Hospital Center/NYU School of Medicine
 
For more information, send mail to [log in to unmask] with the message: info PED-EM-L
The URL for the PED-EM-L Web Page is:
  http://www.brown.edu/Administration/Emergency_Medicine/ped-em-l.html