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Michael Farris wrote:
 
> One *strong* suggestion: Dump the accents!
>
> Is it *really* that important for people to stress the first syllable of
> pagine (sp?) or the last of liberta (sp?). If it's "natural" they'll do it
> without prompting, if it isn't then who cares? Accents that are used in some
> natural languages have no more place in an IAL than accents used in no
> natural language.
 
I partly agree and partly disagree.
As everyone already knows, I prefer not to use any accent marks in an IAL,
as I just think they constitute an unnecessary complication.  The basic
rule "stress the vowel before the last consonant", plus one or two
auxiliary rules, gives excellent results if the roots and affixes are
chosen to match.
 
Having said that, I get the impression Michael is proposing something
different.  He is saying that ensuring that the same word is stresed by all
in the same place is not important enough to justify using accent marks.
My view is that if Occ is going to choose its forms in the way it does,
then the basic stress rules applicable to Novial will not be enough.  In
this case I think use of some accent mark(s) to indicate divergent stress
in a word is justifiable.  In other words, Occ could have chosen the affix
form -itate, but it has in fact chosen -ita.  Given this choice, either an
extra stress rule is going to be required for this affix, or the stress
(which must be on "a") must be indicated by an auxiliary mark.
 
To this extent I disagree that an accent mark used in some languages is
no more justified in an IAL than one used in none.  The fact of the matter
is that Occ can use either grave or acute accents, and one of these
(usually both) is available in the vast majority of typesets, printing
establishments etc.  I think the inconveniences of the Occ accents are
far less than those of the Esp ones, tho there are still some.  But the
only alternative would be to change the forms of various words and affixes
(in other words follow the same approach as Novial).
 
What I do find rather misleading is when Occ is presented sans accent
marks, hiding the fact that some words are stressed on unusual syllables.
 
James Chandler
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