Print

Print


Carlos Eugenio Thompson Pinz=C3=B3n wrote:
 
> In case some one has some doubts.
> Point 1: Signed Languages are not IAL.
> Point 2: Signed Languages are not universal.
> Point 3: Signed Languages are complete languages.
>
 
Hola, Carlos
 
I'm a linguist who has done (and plans to continue) research on Polish Si=
gn Language,
so I'm glad to see someone else on this list, is interested in signed lan=
guages.
 
A few months ago, I posted some info about sign languages (should be in t=
he archives)
 
 
> I've been involved with Signed Languages used by Deaf communities and p=
eople
> to communicate with each other.  As shown in the Nicaraguan case, signi=
ng is
> a natural way of communicate (even in listen-capable people) and gramma=
tical
> capability is somehow wired in our brains the way a person can develop =
its
> own grammar when a child.  It seams children develop their own grammar =
and
> inmertion in  their environmental language is corrective.  Creoles seem=
s to
> show some of that natural programming so the suggestion of using a Creo=
le
> grammar with the vocabulary extracted from an existing auxlang like
> Occidental, Interlingua or Glossa, is a good one.
 
I'm glad you liked the idea.
 
>
>
> Signed languages have a feature difficult to find in talked or written
> languages (I would say English is a talked language with a written form=
 and
> Interlingua is a written language one can talk): use of spatial
> relationships which are more clear than the use of prepositions or case
> markers in a talked/written language.  These spatial relationships help
> showing grammatical relationships of verbs and concepts.
>
> Some lesson of the Colombian Signed Language could help describe this:
>
> > Phrase structure is OSV and the temporal and spatial ubication comes
> first.
 
hmm I bet that Colombian Sign Language is most likely SVO with the possib=
ility of
changing to OSV for emphasis (like ASL) all natural sign languages I know=
 of tend
toward SVO order with some possibility of changing word  order for emphas=
is.
Interestingly, Polish Sign Language tends toward pretty strict SVO order.=
 (Although
SOV and OSV are sometimes found).
 
> >
> > Verbs are classified as flat or simple verbs (usually those with one
> person
> > involved) like to think, to sleep, to eat, and flexional verbs.
> > Flexional verbs are verbs with classificators (don't know the English
> word),
 
classifiers
 
 
> I think some discution can be drawn in a way of implementing an
> International Auxiliary Signed Language (IASL) not only for Deaf people.
>
> Some backdraws, IMO: people must look to the speaker/signer, there is n=
ot
> easy hardcopy way of recording that language (a written form)... a talk=
ed
> form is not needed.
 
There are a number of writing systems for signed languages, although none=
 has yet come
to be used by deaf people. It's quite possible to write signed languages.
 
>
>
> Of course, one experiment would be develope a full language with writte=
n,
> talked and signed forms.
 
Well, what about GESTUNO?
 
I've read a couple of articles about "International Sign Language" which =
indicates
that most of the morphological processes of natural sign languages also o=
ccur in
"international signing".
 
hmm actualy this is really interesting, now that you remind me ...Deaf pe=
ople actually
*DO* have a sort of standardized basic vocabulary for use in some interna=
tional
meetings. I've seen references to it on German TV, I'll have to check it =
out. Might be
a model for spoken IAL's in there somehow.
 
Amikel,
Mike Farris