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On Sat, 31 Oct 1998 10:18:53 -0200 Who? <[log in to unmask]>
> writes:
> >Hi all!
>
> >Also, syllabic consonants: how frequent are they? Have you
> >ever used them? By "syllabic consonants" I mean consonant
> >sounds that can be treated as vowels, i. e. they can form a
> >syllable, and be stressed. I know at least Chinese has a syllabic
> >"r". My new conlang is having lots of syllabic consonants; in
> >fact, voiced fricatives can all be syllabic.
>
> >--Pablo Flores

   Enamyn revels in syllabic consonants. Other than oral stops (/p b t
d k g/), any consonant can be syllabic. In frequency, /m n l r/ are
the most common in Enamyn, which is why in the "native" orthography,
the syllabic equivalents of these consonants have modified characters.
   :Peter
P.S. Once I decided that I wanted more syllabic consonants, I did a
little fudging with the phonological rules, not to mention the
romanization, which is why Enamin is now spelled Enamyn: the "y"
preceeding a consonant (can) indicate a syllabic consonant. Thus,
/En.am.n/.
==
 _____      _____________________________________________________
   |  \   O) ...for Christ plays in ten thousand places,         )
  _|__/    | Lovely in limbs, and lovely in eyes not his         |
 / |eter   | To the Father through the features of men's faces.  |
 | |       | -Gerard Manley Hopkins, "As Kingfishers Catch Fire" |
 \___lark  (_____________________________________________________(O

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