Print

Print


la mayk.faris. cusku di'e
 
 
> One mark of a languages 'ease of innovation' measure is how easy is it =
to integrate
> new words (from any source) into the language. This the major problem w=
ith POS
> marking, IMHO. In Eo, a noun's gotta end in -o which means adding it fo=
r new words
> that end in consonants and figuring out something else for words that e=
nd in other
> vowels. In other words, every new word has to be individually "nativize=
d" in Eo and
> in any IAL that has POS marking. This is fine in an ethnic language, bu=
t is probably
> too awkward to be workable in an IAL where different speakers are going=
 to have very
> different ideas about what should be nativized how.
>
 
Good point.  But a certain amount of nativisation is both easy and
inevitable, and happens anyway with natlangs.  If, for example, the
source language possesses a phoneme which is not present in the target
language, the pronunciation (and often the spelling) of the word will
naturally be modified; thus French "petit beure" becomes Turkish
"petib=F6r", for example (just as many years ago Arabic "Walid" became
"Veled").  IALs tend to have a fairly limited set of phonemes (with
good reason; any IAL which had the Bushman /!k/ cluster, or insisted
that speakers make the same distinction between aspirated and
unaspirated consonants as Sanskrit would be a non-starter) and so a
large number of loanwords will be phonemically simplified.  No problem
there, I think; after all, only the most outrageous snobs insist on
pronouncing French loanwords in English with French vowels, and even
the BBC can't pronounce "Beijing" remotely like the Chinese do.
 
Morphological nativisation is a bit more problematic, but if the
morphology of the IAL is straightforward, there should still be few
problems.  Let's say that in our IAL all nouns end in "o", verbs in
"a" and adjectives in "i".  If your loanword ends in a consonant (or
consonantal Y), add the appropriate vowel; if it ends in a vowel,
change the vowel, or (if that would be ambiguous) add H+vowel.  Thus
with  and Turkish "ney" (a kind of reed flute) and Chinese "Dao", I
would get:
 
neyo - ney
neya - to play the ney
neyi - resembling a ney
 
daoho - Tao
daoha - to flow with the Tao?
daohi - Taoist
 
I must admit here that my favourite conlang, Lojban, scores rather
poorly in this area.  "Mike Farris" can be Lojbanised easily (as at
the top of this mail) but Lojban le'avla (loanwords) while easy to
construct, can be rather hard to spit out, e.g. Turkish (language)
comes out as "bangrturk".  There again, Lojban has different
priorities, but that would be the subject of a different thread .....
 
Robin Turner