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At 12:46 PM 10/31/98 -0500, Chris Burd wrote:
>> At 06:16 PM 10/18/98 +0100, James Chandler wrote:
>> >Paul Bartlett rote:
>> >
>> >>     I tend to concur.  Many people speaking WENSA languages frequently
>> >> -use- words with Greek and Latin elements, but, within their languages'
>> >> derivation systems, they tend to use those words as lexical wholes
>> >> without necessarily having much real understanding of their Greco-Latin
>> >> formative elements.
>
>This point can be exaggerated in either direction. Surely nobody thinks of
"helicopter" as "helico" + "pter" (spiral-wing?); on the other hand, I
remember Don Harlow arguing that average person doesn't understand
"malpractice" as a combination of "mal" + "practice" (ie., bad practice).
That is clearly untenable, and condescending to boot.
>  [  ........................  ]
> But there are vast numbers of Latin/Greek affixes and combinatory forms
that are generally understood. If I say "neurometer" for example, most
people with at least a secondary school education will imagine a device for
measuring neural activity.
>
*   Scientific terminology remains the one language that hs become truly
universal.
 
Saluta,
 Robin
 
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