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Hi Nik,

I'm posting this to the list in case anyone else knows about the Danish "a"=
...


> Joshua Shinavier wrote:
> > Austria:
> >   other languages:
> >     Allemannisch:
> >       Country: Eisterraisch ['Ajst.Er.rAjS]
>=20
> Allemannisch, as in Spanish _alema'n_ or French _allemagne_ (sp?)?=20
> Interesting.

Allemannisch is (so I've read) a term for some Germanic dialects such
as Austrian and Swiss German.


> > Denmark:
> >   national language is -->Danish
> >   in Danish: Danmark ['d&n.mark]
>=20
> This [&] is ash?

I don't know if it's pronounced this way all over, but a Danish girl I used
to know pronounced the a as an ash; if anyone has any broader data, post it=
!

>=20
> > England:
> >   in English: England ['iNg.land]
> >   adj, person: English ['iNg.liS]
>=20
> Shouldn't that be [iNg.l@nd] and [iNg.lIS]?  Or is that just my dialect?

Yes it should.  I am, as I said, an IPA ignoramus, and very typo-prone on
top of that.  Thanks for pointing it out.


> > Germany:
> >   national langauge --> German
> >   in German: Deutschland ['dojtS.land] (hard final /d/)
>=20
> I thought it was a [t]?

That's what you'll find in a "learn German" book, but to me it's not as har=
d as
a [t]; an actual hard t as in "Kante" would be *too* hard; I'd rather write=
 [d].
I know Germans who pronounce it as an ordinary [d], in fact; I don't think
either form is "correct" or "incorrect".

>=20
> > Iceland:
> >   in Icelandic: =CDsland ['is.land]
> >   person from Iceland: =CDslendingur ['is.lend.iN.ur] (not sure about s=
tress)
> >   adj.: =EDslensk ['is.lensk]
>=20
> I thought that the acute meant a long vowel?

So do I; the [e] is wrong; it should be [E], but the [i] is long as it
should be.
  ['is.land]
  ['is.lEnd.IN.ur]
  ['is.lEnsk]


JJS