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Hi,> Allemannisch is (so I've read) a term for some Germanic dialects such
> as Austrian and Swiss German.
I don't know about Alemannisch spoken in Austria, but in Switzerland
and neighbouring Germany, and Alsace and ?> > > Germany:
> > >   national langauge --> German
> > >   in German: Deutschland ['dojtS.land] (hard final /d/)> >=20
> > I thought it was a [t]?>
> That's what you'll find in a "learn German" book, but to me it'snotas har=
> d as> a [t]; an actual hard t as in "Kante" would be *too* hard; I'drather
write=>  [d].
> I know Germans who pronounce it as an ordinary [d], in fact; I don'tthink
> either form is "correct" or "incorrect".
The problem here is that we are dealing with two features
differentiating German [d] and [t] *,
namely voiced/unvoiced and - actually more important! -
aspirated/non-aspirated. The final "d" is unvoiced but normally
non-aspirated. Nevertheless it sounds stranger to me to make it voiced
than aspirated, and that's why I vote for /t/ here.
* took me some time to find square brackets on the Japanese keyboard...
Oliver from Chiba