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Paul wrote:
 
>     Relexification is certainly a danger, because it leads to inclusion
> of idioms.  It is on this point that I have taken issue with the stance
> of one participant on this forum who shall here go nameless.  A serious
> problem with constructed auxlangs, as I see it, is that many
> unsophisticated users of an auxlang may simply not realize that they
> are merely relexifying native idioms which are often at best baffling
> to others who do not know that same native tongue well.  English's
> somewhat notorious phrasal verbs are another serious danger for native
> anglophones attempting to use a conIAL.
 
Relexification is bound to be a problem with any 2nd language,
constructed or not. It's certainly a problem with non-native
users of English. What unsophisticated users do with a language is,
frankly, outside the control of the language authorities. Guidelines
or rules or prescriptions will simply be ignored.
 
However, certain factors will tend to come to the rescue. (1) Good
teachers and didactic materials (not to be underrated) (2) Trial and
error. Someone who's having trouble communicating in their
relexified idiolect will tend adjust their usage until they make
themselves understood (and if they are understood to begin with,
what's the problem?). (3) Influence of exemplars. People adjust their
usage based on what they read and hear, based on their sense of what
usages have prestige. Someone who uses a very highly anglicised
Interlingua is likely to modify their usage based on what they
read in Panorama, for example.
 
>     Despite the apparent position of another sometime participant, I do
> think that relexification is a problem, and I agree that the "at sight"
> Euroclones pose a particular risk.  (I have noticed this with
> Interlingua, but also with Glosa, which does not necessarily seem to be
> entirely "at sight," despite some claims for it.)
 
I don't see Glosa as being "at sight" at all, no more so than
Esperanto, possibly less so. I expect Euroclones are more prone
to relexification simply because the "false friend" problem looms
larger. But I don't really think that overall language performance at
a given level of study is going to be higher in an "alien" language
(Lojban, say). I mean, I can well imagine that anglophone beginner
at Cantonese will do less relexification than a beginner at Spanish.
But I think the Spanish beginner would still have more luck carrying
on a conversation with a native Spanish speaker.
 
 
Chris Burd