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At 01:31 PM 11/18/98 -0800, Charles wrote:
>On Wed, 18 Nov 1998, Robin Gaskell wrote:
>
>> *    Yes, I refer here to the part of the brain, discovered through aphasia
>> studies, to be responsible for the general task of systematising the words,
>> generated in other brain regions, into sequential form.
>>      I follow the hypothesis that syntax is the fundamental grammatical
>> element throughout the human experience of language.
>>      Having said that, I must hasten to add that while syntax is directly
>> observable, and appears to be a first approach to grammatical analysis, it
>> is more of a mechanical approach to language.  There is, it seems, a second
>> level of grammatical analysis, called Semantic Grammar, that is much more
>> involved with the systematisation of meaning within language.
>
>A successful IAL must be easily learnable by adults, and
>all current research indicates that pidgin/creole grammar
>is the way to go; yet, I have found but few good descriptions
>on the net of what such a grammar would look like.
>Perhaps it would much resemble Glosa ... The best URL
>I have found is: http://www.siu.edu/departments/cola/ling/
>
*   By the method of their creation creoles, and especially pidgins, are
very short-lived .. in their pristine forms.  The Nugini language is a
farly recent creole that is being standardised by being adopted as the
country's official language.  It could yield up some of the grammatical
secrets.
 
    However, it is not by accident that Glosa has some of its inputs from
English, and that English is taught, at schools, without reference to the
Grammar Book.  The story is that English is a Creole in its later stages:
while the many invasions of Britain have kept the creolisation process in
progress over a period of a thousand years or so, the resulting language
carries many of the tensions and unresolved questions of usage, that we
find in creoles.
 
   Because there is usually a large chance factor in pidgin formation, and
the languages are not regulated by pedogogues, the languages "float" and
are open to the influence of the people.  And under such circumstances,
language, like water, finds a common level: without the influence of
scholars, usage is the final arbiter on grammar, and there is little time
for the development of complex morphological structures in the words.
While words repesent ideas, there is no conscious categorisation of words
into labels, descriptions and actions, so the language when unwritten is
very open, but some 'rules' tend to just appear - as the language is being
used: small particles may arise to indicate possession, or the
interrogative; such things would seem to happen 'subconsciously'.
   Yes, Glosa does tend to have approximated the pidgin/creole formula.
But without the impetus of trading to force the language along, the lack of
written grammar and shortage of the normal linguistic signposts makes it
unattractive to the Week-end Linguist, who might be taking an interest in
the language for academic reasons.  Yet still, Glosa  has that immediate
quality which is seen in creoles, and which makes them readily adoptable.
 
Interesting ..
 Robin
 
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