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>
>Paul O Bartlett wrote:
>
>> I do
>> think that relexification is a problem, and I agree that the "at sight"
>> Euroclones pose a particular risk.  (I have noticed this with
>> Interlingua, but also with Glosa, which does not necessarily seem to be
>> entirely "at sight," despite some claims for it.)
>
>At-sight can only work within some region where the natlangs
>share a common ancestry, so Ia does well within Europe,
>and even the relexed idioms usually are understood;
>still, I wish the grammar of Ia were more restrictive,
>defining where the bl**dy unmarked adjectives go.
 
I think this illustrates quite well that the problem some are having with
Interlingua lies more in the way it is presented in the text books than how
it really is a a language.
 
Once I heard a wonderful example of Finnish relexification in English, in a
conversation between a Finnish and a Swedish speaker who had to use English
as their means of communication. I don't remember who used the word
_society dog_ for English _pet dog_. Swedish _s=E4llskap_ and Finnish _seura=
_
both mean society, but the Swediah, at least can also be translated
_company_, the act of _acompanying_ someone somewhere. But the two
interlocutors could understand eachother perfectly, and so did the person
who subtitled the dialogue!
 
Relexification takes place all the time and expressions wander from one
language to another, as they always have done. This is nothing new, and it
is nothing to be scared about. To use a Swedish idiom that I am aware of:
Swedish is overloused with English idioms. (Actually the Swedish is
_nerlusad_ "downloused" (infested with lice).
 
=46ollow up. =3D F=F6lja upp
Cover an event =3D T=E4cka en h=E4ndelse (ett evenemang) (as a journalist do=
es)
Have a nice day. =3D Ha en bra dag. (horrende)
Country club. =3D Country club
(Funny, as I think most speakers just know that _country_ is "landet" and
_club_ is a _klubb_. (And it looks like the country clubs on TV.)
 
An acquaintance of mine who is a professional English-speaking translator
here in Sweden told me that many adds in the newspapers written in English
are not English at all, and an English native speaker would not understand
them. There, English is used as some kind of a firewall for God-knows-what
kind of =E9lite!
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
>For a world language, I begin to think that deriving
>words from *any* ancient or proto- natlang is wrong.
>There are not enough truly "international" words.
>Nobody has tried it recently, but I think maybe
>a new class-hierarchical language is the Way;
>a dictionary would amount to a small encyclopedia ...
>and it would be easy to memorize and use the top-level
>words, which would be the shortest and most common.
>I imagine the WordNet noun hierarchy, relexed.
>
>[BTW, I have to check the TO address field carefully,
>since almost every reply ends up going to the poster
>instead of the list. I think the list server is sick.]
 
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