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Tu scribeva:
>Mike Ramsay wrote:
>
>> I often think about those times in the "Idistaro." I wonder
>> how everybody's doing?
>
>Mike: you may know this already but there is a mailing list for Ido.
>To subscribe, send the message:  subscribe idol  to the address:
>[log in to unmask]
>
>When were you active in the Ido movement?  I'd be interested to hear about
>the nature of your involvement.
>
>Kordiale,
>James Chandler.
>
 
I started an Ido organization at my undergraduate university
(I'm now a graduate student). We were small, but we
had members from Saudi Arabia and Columbia. We gave
Ido lessons to dozens of people, although we had to prod
some of them. We also had a correspondence course.
I published in Progreso and Ido-Vivo.
 
Ido was a big improvement over Esperanto, but my tutees
tended to balk at the intrusion of purely English-based
words, such as reda, into the vocabulary. To me,
Interlingua comes across as a single, seamless language.
Ido fell a little short of achieving this effect, but
I think it's a decent language on the whole.
 
All the best,
Mike Ramsay