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Hi Charles,
 
The Idists' take on this, as I remember,
was that nothing untoward occurred during
the meetings of the Delegation.
 
Here's the story as I remember it. Keep in mind
that this is from memory.
 
The Volapuk movement had been large and successful.
But when Esperanto was introduced, the Volapukists switched
to the new language en masse--**according to the
Esperantic spin**. The Volapuk movement essentially
ended. But the results of my own search suggested
that no influx of any size occurred until years later,
because of the World's Fair. The Volapuk movement continued.
 
From the start, people within the Esperanto movement
proposed reforms, and people outside the movement
championed alternatives. I think Idiom Neutral
was one of those alternatives. Many former Volapukists
supported it. Even Zamenhof proposed a reform of
Esperanto. Was it the UMI that reprinted the proposal?
I have a copy of it at home.
 
The IAL movement, relatively unified during Volapuk's heyday,
was bitter, fragmented, and torn by internal hostilities.
The Delegitaro (Delegation) was an effort to bring unity.
Delegates representing the major IALs would meet to decide
which system should be used.
 
I think the Delegitaro deliberated for several weeks.
All its members had agreed to abide by its decision.
But the Esperantists generally thought that the
deliberations of the Delegation were merely a
formality. They felt that Esperanto was the only
contender that had a chance. Supposedly, no other
IAL was successful enough to be taken seriously.
 
One of the proposals that the Delegation considered was
yet another Espo reform called Ido. Unexpectedly--
at least to the Esperantists--the Delegation selected
Ido. Furious, the Esperantists refused to abide by this
decision and a schizm developed. On one side were those
Esperantists who remained loyal. On the other were
most of the Delegation, its deliberating committee,
roughly a fourth of the Esperantists, and Louis de Beaufront,
Samenhoff's right-hand homarano. And Volapuk and
several other IALs continued to maintain a following.
 
In spite of claims that the Ido movement has died out,
the Volapuk movement has died out, the Interlingua
movement has died out, and so on, these movements
are still around. There are Lojban and Occidental/Lingue
movements. The Interlingua movement is large, increasing,
and successful. And thanks to the internet, any computer
-literate person can find all this out for themselves.
Can the Esperanto movement, already in decline, survive
the belying of so much misinformation?
 
Hmmm...
Food for thought! :)
 
Amicalmente,
Mike Ramsay