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Responde al Paul BARTLETT:
 
> On Sun, 13 Dec 1998, emerson alcott wrote (excerpt):
>
> [concerning an Interlingue web page in/about Esperanto:]
> >                                       I was only mildly surprised to see
> > that the first paragraph mentioned how they (the interlingue-ists) were
> > 'sorry' they couldn't find a font to accomodate the supersigns 'anywhere'
> > and that 'unfortunately' we'd just have to do without them.
>
>     I do not claim to be a technical expert on the world wide web, but
> my understanding is that the matter of fonts pertains to the -reader-,
> NOT the writer.  A writer could place material on the web according to
> the ISO-8859-3 (ISO Latin-3) encoding, which is commonly done for
> Esperanto sites that I have browsed.  It makes no difference whether
> the writer can display the Esperanto supersigned letters correctly or
> not, as there are various ways of -writing- them even without being
> able to view them properly.  It then becomes a matter of a -reader-
> being able to -view- the characters properly once they are there.
>
100% correct. You can (and have been able to, since the very
beginning of the Web) put up material in any language you wanted,
whatever its orthography, at the very worst by using the "E"
system to describe each character. (This is an example of use, not
the name of the system.) This applies to English, Spanish,
Esperanto, Russian, Japanese, etc. How it appears in any
given individual's browser is, as you say, another question,
and depends on (a) the browser in question, (b) the operating
system's graphical capabilities, and (c) what fonts the
_reader_ has installed, in those systems that accept fonts...
 
Assuming that what Emerson wrote is a more-or-less accurate rendition
of what's written on the page in question, the person who wrote it
was (a) ignorant, (b) disingenuous or (c) (something else a bit
stronger).
 
--Don HARLOW
http://www.webcom.com/~donh/
(English version: http://www.webcom.com/~donh/dona.html)