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Je 11:19 ptm 12/18/98 +0000, Kapitano Eglefino skribis:
 
>Don Harlow wrote:
>>>          OK                            jes, en ordo
>> Also "bone" is not uncommon. Also "Jes ja!" but that may be a bit
>> too emphatic.
>
>   Given that EO has phatic words like 'Nu', 'Ba!' and 'Ej!", it seems
>odd not to have words specifically meaning '(It is functioning) okay'
>and 'I understand your instruction and will comply'.
 
Actually, lots of languages don't have such a word, which is probably why
"OK" is so popular. (Not to mention, in some countries, "All right", which
I used to find written as a single word in the middle of Danish
science-fiction novels when I lived there back in '59.) Incidentally, you
can also occasionally hear "Oke'" in Esperanto as an interjection, and
that, in the nature of things, can be used as a root ("Li okeis tion", "Lia
okeo rajtigis min fari tion", "Tiu estas tute okea konduto"...). I don't
know what the Academy thinks of this, but, again in the nature of things,
nobody worries a lot about that.
 
>>>         football                      futbalo (sport)
>> Americans, beware -- this is not the kind we play here under this name.
>
>   Is there an agreed-upon way to distinguish between American Football and
>Soccer? Maybe there's 'Usona Futbalo' and 'Brita/Euxropa Futbalo'? or is
>there
>an asymetrical disambiguation, such as between 'Futbal (aux Usona aux
>Euxropa)'
>and 'Sokero'.
>
When the need arises (rarely; my interest in sports generally extends to
the need to flip the channel when I see a team on the screen), I usually
distinguish between "futbalo" and "usona futbalo". This is a personal
custom and not binding on anybody else who speaks the language. The word
"sokero" or some variant does not, to my knowledge, exist.
 
>
>> >>         gay                           goja (happy)
>> "Gaja". (Typo?)
>
>   Well, I was thinking of 'Gaja', but with 'gxoja' in the background. An
>accidental portmanteauism.
>        Actually, have you come across any/many spoonerisms (e.g=
 'tibliobeko'
>for 'biblioteko', or 'ne matu baltrankville' for 'ne batu maltrankville')=
 or
>portmanteau words (eg. 'grero' for 'grava ero', or 'krokolaute' for
>'krokodili laute'), either as errors or deliberate jokes?
>
Can't remember ever hearing either spontaneously, though I suppose the
latter crops up every now and then. For the former, check out
 
http://www.esperanto.mv.ru/Kruko/Lat3/index.html
 
which contains Louis BEAUCAIRE's notorious "Kruko kaj Baniko el Bervalo" in
its entirety. Beaucaire created a number of such expressions under the name
of "Bervala=BCoj" (apparently he wasn't familiar with the English term
"Spoonerism". First example in the book below; interchange the two
capitalized vowels and do the same with the two capitalized consonants and
you get a sentence with quite a different meaning...
 
"Se vi volas allIgi la vagOnon, lasu vian Planon =E6e la Gi=E6eto."
 
Of course, there may be some (Freudian) similarity of meaning between the
original (above) and the modified sentences, as anybody who has seen the
last minute of Hitchcock's "North By Northwest" can testify...
 
>
>>>         rock (music)                          [don't know, but
>>>                                               suggest rokmuziko]
>> Believe it or not, sometimes "rokenrolo" or even "roknrolo".
>
>   Seeing as Esperantolando is such a musical place, it's surprising that
>I can't find many terms for styles of music. There are plenty of words for
>musical instruments, such as the fairly transparent Saksofono, Piano,
>Akordiono, and Cimbalo, but it seems not for Soul, Heavy Metal, Reggae,
>and Hip Hop.
 
You might want to take a look at
 
http://cgi.algonet.se/~bertilow/cgi-bin/m.cgi?d=3Droko/index.htm
 
>        BTW, if in the next few years you hear a of band called Herezulo
>playing Hauxsmuziko with Esperantaj kaj Anglaj Lirikoj, that'll be me.
>
Do you subscribe to "Rok-Gazet"? Also, don't forget that a number of
Esperanto book services also handle music cassettes and CDs with Esperanto
or mixed lyrics.
 
(Of course, in my personal opinion real music died with Ralph Vaughan
Williams..;)
 
>
>>>         video                                 [can anyone help me
>>>                                               with this one?]
>>What does it mean, in this context?
>
>   No context given, but it could mean:
>Video cassette          ?Vide-kaseto (Kaseto Videa)
  Vidbendo, usually
 
>Video Recorder          ?Vide-registrilo (Registrilo Videa)
  Most commonly, kamerao. But, of course, you're also free to use
vidregistrilo, vidbendregistrilo, etc.
 
>Video Movie                     ?Vide-filmo (Filmo Videa)
  No specific term has been adopted for this; I generally call it a
"kinobendo" (movie tape), but this is a personal preference (though totally
understandable). To the best of my knowledge, this lack of a specific term
is also true of American English; at least I can't think of one off-hand.
=20
 
 =20
 
-- Don HARLOW
http://www.webcom.com/~donh/
(English version: http://www.webcom.com/~donh/dona.html)