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>>                                      I think designers of
>> so-called simplified auxiliary languages have to ask themselves why
>> English, nevertheless, is the most successful auxiliary world language in
>> the world today?
>
>    The comment has arisen more than once that it is probably not
>linguistic characteristics of an auxiliary language ("natural" -or-
>constructed) which will make or break its acceptance and use.
>Esperanto's '-n' morpheme or Interlingua's alleged "three conjugations
>of verbs" in the end will probably make no appreciable difference to
>widespread acceptance or rejection of those languages.
>
>--
>Paul
 
Right, Paul! What makes a language expand its range are the social,
cultural, religious, economic, and military forces that impel it.
People must feel that by learning the language they get access to
something they want they could not get without learning the language.
Easiness may seem compelling to auxiliary language hobbyists, but if
only a small group will share in your code, they may not provide you
with anything you desire to make you want to continue using the
language no matter how easy the language may be.
 
Stan