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Bob scribeva:
>IN ESPERANTO
>(many radicals)
A puristic esperanto might have had:
 
>univers/o, universal/a; chiumondo (Old Z had _wszechswiat_ in Polish which
>inspired him a lot making Esperanto, as it seams, but not in this case).
 
>orient/o, orientalisim/o: sunlevighejo, sunlevighejano
Polonese ha _ascension_ pro _oriento_
 
>kondich/o, kondicional/a
This was one of the hard things when you had to learn the large ethnical
languages that we had on our curriculum.
 
>neutr/a, neutral/a
neamba, neambaua; neambauema
 
>krim/o, kriminal/a
krimo, krima, krimulo (criminal person)
 
>radik/o, radikal/a
radiko (root) radikala (who, what, goes to the root, rooty (radika, ghisradi=
ka)
 
>norm/o, normal/a
normo, norma (launorma)
 
>mens/o, mental/a
menso, mensa
 
>potenc/o. potencial/o
potenco, potenca; enpotenca
 
>horizont/o, horizontal/a
vidcirklo, vidcirkla
>spec/o, special/a
speco, speca, lauspeca
 
>individu/o, individualist/o, individual/ismo
nedividebla, unuopulo, unuopulisto, unuopulismo
 
>nom/o, nominal,a, nominativ/o
nomo, noma, launoma; nomkazo
 
>du, dualec/o, dualist/o, dualism/o
du, dueco, duecisto, duecismo
 
>materi/o, material/o, materialist/o, materialism/o
materio, materiajho, materiajhisto, materiajhismo (the ism of material thing=
s)
 
>natur/o, naturalist/o, naturalism/o
naskumo, naskumisto, naskumismo (cfr et Polish _przyroda, Russ. priroda,
=46inn. luonto)
 
>IN OCCIDENTAL
Could one have given Esperanto more international endings? Like this:
>(a single radical)
>
>univers/e, univers/al; omniunio
>orient/e, orient/al/isme: supriria, supririano, supririanismo,
 
>condition, condition/al
 
>neutr/i, neutr/al
utra =3D either of these two; neutra =3D none of these two, neutritata (neut=
ral).
 
>crimin/e, crimin/al, criminalitate
krimine, krimini, criminitato
 
>radic/a, radic/al
radiko, radika
 
>norm/e, norm/al
normo, norma
 
>ment/e, ment/al
mento, menta
 
>potent/i/e, potent/i/al/e
potento, potenta
 
>horizont/e, horizont/al
vidcirklo, visionio
 
>speci/e, speci/al
speco, speca
 
>individu/e, individu/al/ist, individu/al/isme
 
Etc. The problem is that all the learners of such an Esperanto would have
to learn the convention of this new way of treating international
vocabulary.
 
Perhaps one could say that both Esperanto and Occidental do use the
international vocabulary, but they put the limit where to rely on the own
language's resources on different levels. Something like, how far can you
realy on your own system and where do you have to stop?
 
Let's say that a language is governed by a system that at one stage looks
quite regular for the users. Then there occurs a sedimentation of ever new
strata, and suddenly you have to be schooled into the language, depending
from who has the norm.
 
One could study the evolution of Esperanto and examine some hypotheses
against Esperanto itself.
 
I suppose that Esperanto in its beginning had a very large number of
Russian and Polish speakers. They put their brand on the language. Then
came - I suppose - a more French period, with the Ido crisis as it's
ultimate sign. I would seriously cont the _Hungarian_ school with Baghy and
Kalocsay as a third, more puristic epoche, somewhat tilting Esperanto back
to its origine. Then we have the time after the Second World War with a
much more western European bias (with Waringhien and others having a very
strong influence of the language.)
 
With the necessary time (and money) and brains and interest (motivation) I
think one could see if this hypothesis sticks, using all the tools of
modern linguistics and litterary research.
 
As far as I understand all the persons I have mentioned here did knew other
languges than just Esperanto and their mother tongues. They were highly
intellectual persons and there use of esperanto was a kind of discours
between Esperantodom and the surrounding languages.
 
If the millions of Chinese that are supposed to speak Esperanto will have a
stronger impact on Esperanto I don't think it is farfeched to suppose that
there could well be a return to a more puristic tradition.
 
If I myself would construct an auxiliary language on the Esperanto
principles I would try to draw on such things like _user-frendly_ _helping
inclined_ etc. which would make word building very efficient. A lot of
languages translate such things as _user-frendly_ and _-ary_. And in an
international language you could then substitute Esperanto's _ujo_ with
_-ario_ herbario_ _cafeario_, carnario_ (meat can) or whatever!
 
Esperantos _ema_ must come from French _aimer_ etc.
 
These are just some thoughts.
 
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