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Tom Wier wrote:
> What most linguistic texts I've seen do is:
>
> (a) the text of the language itself
> (b) a morpheme by morpheme translation
> (c) an English gloss

There's sometimes a line between (a) and (b), for morphemic breakdown of
the language, so using your example, IINM:

> (a) kwonom ailuromkwe meos ne weidakwibat.
      kwon-o-m ailur-o-m-kwe m-e-o-s ne weida-kwi-ba-t (or something
like that)
> (b) dog:N:ACC cat:N:ACC:and first-person:PR:N:NOM
>      not see:TR:PF:PRES.
> (c) I haven't seen (the) dog and cat.
[snip]
> Most linguistic texts I've seen try to line everything up, but it's more
> of a stylistic thing.  So, I'd advise it, but it's not necessary.

Well, it does make it easier to figure out what's what.

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