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----- Original Message -----
From: Sotiris Tzanlis <[log in to unmask]>
> ( In a normal recreational dive, the divers tissue will NEVER -and I mean
> NEVER- reach a real Super Saturation State. Although in some cases
> Saturation state or Partial Saturation State IS SUFFICIENT TO CREATE A
> DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS).
 
Sorry, I don't buy this. The fast tissues are going to supersaturate on most
every dive done. I do agree that DCS can come about on any dive. Whether
this is due to plain old saturation, partial saturation or supersaturation
neither here nor there as far as I'm concerned.
 
 
> The above situation happens in the dive. the diver is the glass, the water
> is its body and the surface is his lungs. The lungs is the only place that
a
> gas, with a combined partial pressure, come in directly contact with the
> diver and therefore it is the only place that a significant gas exchange
> happens.
 
How about a diver using a drysuit and an inert gas to fill the suit?
 
>
>
> > Also, can you explain, in layman's terms M values and how
> > they play a part
> > in these examples?
>
> Hmmm. I'm afraid I'm not familiar with the "Layman's term M Values".
 
Layman's term refers to a simple or non scientific example. Have found a few
sources yesterday to study this a bit though.
 
 
> Probably I know this by a different name. Remember my natural language is
> Greeks.
> Can you provide some input on this ??
> Maybe a web page to look on.
 
Yeah, but they are home and I'm not. I'll get back to you on that one.
 
> > So you are saying that after dive one above, when the diver
> > exits the water
> > he is He free from that dive?
>
> I don't really understand your sentence here !!!
>
> I'm saying that the diver when he finish his first dive has an amount of
> Helium in his tissues. This amount of Helium decreases over the surface
> time. During the second dive the amount of Helium in his tissues continues
> to decrease over the time and it is completely irrelevant with the amount
of
> Nitrogen dissolved into the tissues during this dive.
 
Won't argue that the remaining He continues to decrease during the second
dive, because if the diver has not done a VERY long surface interval he most
certainly will still have some dissolved He in his tissues. I do believe
that the residual He must be considered for the next dive though.
 
Mike