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At 12:10 AM 8/21/99 -0400, Senor Hef wrote:
>Lee Bell wrote:
>
>> > See what I mean a clone?   Musician, perfect pitch, etc.  From your
>> > description, I think you mean "perfect RELATIVE pitch" as to "perfect
>> > pitch" which means "absolute perfect pitch" -- that you don't need
>> > a tuned piano or a woodwind instrument to give strike or blow a note
>> > for all the musicians in an orchestra to tune to.
>>
>> I've never tried this and, to be honest, never looked into the concept
>> of perfect or relative perfect pitch.  We began to suspect when I
>> would write the notes to tunes while on a car trip to be tried out
>> later.
>
>That is the typical "perfect pitch" in that you can recognize a note by
>hearing it.  If you hear one note followed by another and you can say
>"that is a fourth" or "a major third" you have "relative pitch".  But
>my take on "perfect absolute pitch" would be not only to be able to
>produce a given tone on demand with no other reference, and to make
>matters worse we can get into the fact that the modern standard
>reference tone has the "A" below middle C as 440Hz while in baroque
>times it was 444Hz.  We won't get into Indian music and their monotonic
>scales and other nasties that can drive someone with a western-trained
>ear absolutely nuts!  :-)
>
>Jeff Kell <[log in to unmask]>
>(posting from San Francisco, be home tomorrow; been a nice week)
 
Now we know why your favorite dive plan is "Play it by Ear."
 
-- Bob.
 
P.S.  Didn't realize you deep dive in music too.  :-)