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> Crusty Russ writes:
>
> First, I ain't no doctor...  and you don't need one to tell you that if
> you want to better distinguish conversation you've got to first dig
> those old moldy hearing protectors out of your ears!   :-)
 
Actually, ancient gear is a sore subject:  I've been trying
to get some of our run-of-the mill stuff upgraded to
modern electronic cutoff muffs so that we don't have
to remove muffs to talk between shots.   Its just my
opinion, but we had one "minor" incident awhile back
whose hearing injury probably would have been reduced
had we had e-muffs.   Last I heard, Uncle has already
paid out the cost of around a hundred pairs of e-Muffs
just in medical costs...and the expensive part of the
settlement is still pending.   Penny-wise, dollar-foolish.
 
 
> Speech frequencies are primarily centered in the mid range
> area of the audible spectrum.  If you experience a loss of
> hearing in the mid range area then speech intelligibility
> will be impacted....An important question to answer is WHY
> you are experiencing this loss.... The source noise from both
> of these two examples contain extreme transient sounds that
> are known to contribute to hearing loss, particularly in the speech
> intelligibility range.   In spite of your sensible and commendable
> precautions at  wearing hearing protection, perhaps it is some
> other noise exposure causing a problem that you haven't identified yet.
 
Loud transients are obvious enough :-).  For other sources,
perhaps automotive NVH & radio...nothing really any more
obvious that I can think of.
 
Overall, it begs the question of if mid range loss is an
area that  _might_ somehow be attributable to diving?
 
 
-hh