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Nik Taylor wrote:
>
> Okay, I think I've got the general structure down of my vocalic
> language.
>
> Consonants
> Stops
> b  d  g
> p  t  k
> Nasals
> m  n  ng
> mh nh ngh
> Fricatives
> v  z  gh
> f  s  x
> Glides
> w  y"   j  ( y" = y-umlaut)
> wh  y"h jh
> Liquids
>    l  r
>    lh rh
>
> y-umlaut represents turned-h, that is, rounded palatal glide
>

        Like in French 'lui'?  And are the nasals, glides and liquids followed
by h unvoiced equivalents of the voiced ones ? I like that (even if I'm
unable to pronounce them, at least voluntarily). y" is already very
rare, I wonder if there is any natlang that has y"h. Anybody knows ?

> Vowels
> Orthography   Phonetic
> i y    u      i y    u
>  e oe  o       e o"  o
>   h             E
>    d   a         a   A
>

        The front part is very crowded compared to the back part (that's not a
problem, I know that it happens often). But shouldn't there be a /O/ to
make a counterpart of /E/? Or does [O] already exist as an allophone of
/o/?

[snip]

>
> Grammar
>
> VERBS
>
> Aspect
> Punctual: ri-
> Progressive: --
> Perfective: rid-
> Habitual: jo-
> Prospective: rih-
>
> Tense
> Past: u-
> Present: -- (cannot take punctual)
> Future: jh- (can only take perfective or progressive)
>   For a "simple" future, like "I will walk", the rpesent is used with
> prospective
>

        So when is the future tense used?

[snip]

>
> Class IV
> Repetition: -pja
> First time: -moe
>

        I like the 'first time' modal :) . Can you find a good 'grammatical'
name for it? :)

> Class V
> Begin: -ny
> Stop: -eala (-yme-eala -> -ymiala, -jh-eala -> -jeala)
> Resume: -rolh
>

        Same question for 'resume'. I like it also.

[snip]

>
> NOUNS
>
> Gender
> Sentient being: d-
> Supernatural phenomena: nhe-
> Natural phenomena: mhoe-
> Social groups, phenomena: le-
> Edible Animals: ngime-
> Non-edible Animals: me-
> Edible Plants: ngitd-
> Other: td-
>
> Case
> Nominative: --
> Absolutive: a-

        How do you use them? Is this an ergative, accusative or active
language? (or something even stranger :) )

> Dat/Alienable poss: hna-
> Inalienable poss: ifa-
> Instrumental: yny-
> Locative: ka-
>
> Number
> Singular: --
> Dual: -no (final -y becomes -u)
> Trial: -ly (final -y becomes -u)
> Plural: -nai (final -y becomes -u)
>   It seems that there was once an -y- with these suffixes; incidentally,
> the words for "two", "three", and "many" are no, ly, and nai.  My theory
> is that there was once a plural suffix -y to which these words were
> added, and the -y was then lost, but still shows up in the y+y
> transformation
>

--
        Christophe Grandsire

        Philips Research Laboratories --  Building WB 145
        Prof. Holstlaan 4
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        The Netherlands

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