Print

Print


--0__=DEatU82ArClmJEybbM1P7k45WLHez3MqyqwZc17Xiwfh1DRGYIG8Z6vg
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Disposition: inline




Very Interesting.  Nouns interest me far more than verbs, btw (in any conlanging
exercise).  IMO gender systems reflect more about a (con)culture than any other
purely linguistic feature (ie without going into things like idiom).  I'd guess
that these people are hunter-gatherers, or possibly in some other scenario where
food is harder to come by that in the modern world?

I'm seeing a few mentions of "trial" number around and abouts.  Is this a
feature in many natlangs?





Nik Taylor <[log in to unmask]> on 09/19/99 06:54:35 PM

Please respond to Constructed Languages List <[log in to unmask]>

To:   Multiple recipients of list CONLANG <[log in to unmask]>
cc:    (bcc: Paul Bennett/Townsend/XNCorp)

Subject:  Vocalic Language, take two



*************************************************************
This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential
and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity
to whom they are addressed.
If you have received this email in error please notify the
sender. This footnote also confirms that this email message
has been scanned for the presence of computer viruses.
*************************************************************
--0__=DEatU82ArClmJEybbM1P7k45WLHez3MqyqwZc17Xiwfh1DRGYIG8Z6vg
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Disposition: inline
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable




NOUNS

Gender
Sentient being: =E4-
Supernatural phenomena: nhe-
Natural phenomena: mhoe-
Social groups, phenomena: le-
Edible Animals: ngime-
Non-edible Animals: me-
Edible Plants: ngit=E4-
Other: t=E4-

Case
Nominative: --
Absolutive: a-
Dat/Alienable poss: =E8na-
Inalienable poss: ifa-
Instrumental: yny-
Locative: ka-

Number
Singular: --
Dual: -no (final -y becomes -u)
Trial: -ly (final -y becomes -u)
Plural: -nai (final -y becomes -u)
  It seems that there was once an -y- with these suffixes; incidentally=
,
the words for "two", "three", and "many" are no, ly, and nai.  My theor=
y
is that there was once a plural suffix -y to which these words were
added, and the -y was then lost, but still shows up in the y+y
transformation

--
"If all Printers were determin'd not to print any thing till they were
sure it would offend no body, there would be very little printed" -
Benjamin Franklin
http://members.tripod.com/~Nik_Taylor/X-Files/
http://members.tripod.com/~Nik_Taylor/Books.html
ICQ #: 18656696
AIM screen-name: NikTailor




=

--0__=DEatU82ArClmJEybbM1P7k45WLHez3MqyqwZc17Xiwfh1DRGYIG8Z6vg--