Print

Print


Barry Garcia wrote:
>
> [log in to unmask] writes:
> >So, other native speakers of English: what do you use in those words?
> >/ng/ or /Ng/ or something in between?  It would be interesting to see
> >which dialects use /n/, and which use /N/.
>
> I do not use /N/ in those types of words. Definately /n/.  BTW: I am from
> central California, and i never really hear anyone use /N/ when saying
> those words . Its somewhat of a mix between the two, but leaning far more
> towards /n/ than /N/.

I grew up around Washington, D.C., and I seem to change between /n/ and
/N/ depending on what word it is. "Engulf" comes out /En.gVlf/, but
"language" usually comes out /l&[log in to unmask] Whenever I pronounce a velar
nasal in the middle of a word, I tend to re-articulate the /g/, but, of
course, not at the end of a word (i.e., "being" = /bi.IN/).

--
Dan Seriff <[log in to unmask]>

"Mozart is just God's way of making the rest of us feel inferior."
        - David Barber