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strike -
 
 
> In terms of fatalities, however, figures - I believe they were compiled with
> the help of James Cook University - released a couple of years ago by Dive
> Queensland,  the State's peak recreational diving body would certainly
> suggest otherwise:
>  Area                                                          Fatality Rate
>  Queensland                                             1 in 430,000
>  Australia (total)                                        1 in 120,000
>  America                                                   1 in 100,000
>  Japan                                                        1 in 15,400
 
 
great stats! i must say that my own anecdotal experience is that Japan (my
home country) is not a very safe place for divers. When I went in July for a
trip, the first dive boat didn't have a DM (only the captain, a fisherman
who takes groups out stayed on board); no O2; etc.  On my second dive, it
was just me and the dive guide from the shop on a little putt-putt boat (I
was a bit *upset* when I realized no one was waiting for us topside).
 
The dive guide from the shop was also a bit of a nut. He took me on two 100'
dives (30m), which was fine, my nitrogen loading was high at the end (as can
be expected) but within acceptable bounds. But after he finished with me, he
went and dove with another tourist. His nitro must have been off the charts,
a disaster waiting to happen.
 
Japan gets really high grades for beautiful soft coral formations and the
usual Pacific sea life, but it's a bit of a spooky place to dive. Several
people die each year in Japan diving, and yet the industry there does little
to shape things up. Perhaps one of the badder things about having weak
liability laws. :(
 
Can't say nuttin bad about Oz.
 
Karen