Print

Print


David Strike wrote:
>
> On 24 September 1999 22:56, Karen Nakamura, wrote:
(sneeeeep)
 
> > Can't say nuttin bad about Oz.
>
> Why not!  I do!  :-)
>
> I don't know whether other Australians would agree with me?, (probably not -
> on principle!<BWG>), but in some respects the regulations and Codes of
> Practice that govern diving (certainly those that apply in Queensland),
> while seemingly well-intentioned, do *sometimes*  tend to work against the
> diving industry's best interests.
>
> Not least is the fact that in an attempt to improve safety, they cosset the
> lowest common diving denominator and discourage people from either
> learning - or retaining - valuable knowledge!  (I asked a certified nitrox
> diver just a couple of hours ago what the reccomended PPO2 limit was and
> they couldn't even tell me what PPO2 meant!)  :-)
 
Uhhh, Strike, you _really_ didn't expect me not to fall for that bait? :-)
 
i) The Queensland regs are quite possibly an indirect, if not direct,
result of the "lowest common denominator factor" in the current standard
of Scuba training witnessed in this country and elsewhere. I know,
sweeping statement. I rather doubt that most on this Forum would disagree.
 
ii) Then you gave me the perfect example "they couldn't even tell me
what PPO2 meant!": Whilst I am _not_ nitrox certified I _do_ know what
PPO2 means and entails. FUC 5.2, I even know how to calculate it.
Actually I knew how to do this long before nitrox was thought of, if
only to learn (for myself) how to avoid OxTox territory.
 
Actually I would have thought its not that hard, which only goes to show
that some people should not be certified at *anything*. I consider that
if I can do it, the majority should be able to do so.
 
Sadly, currently the onus is on the Instructor to *certify* rather than
*fail*, which includes certifying rather than failing _instructors_.
That's a significant statement BTW folks and I'm readying myself for the
flak <BG>. Considering that we are referring to an issue which requires
a life support system (how thoroughly are those astronauts trained?
Sometimes failed?) it really begs the question.
 
There are still (but increasingly less I would have thought) some great
instructors out there and I know of a pair locally. Yet whilst being
under the umbrella of a training organisation, this pair really teach to
their own standards which happen to be much more stringent, more
complex. For example, their novice divers actually know what a ditch and
recovery means.
 
Then again, how much longer is this seeming deterioration in training
standards, not just, it seems, in entry level standards, going to continue?
 
A nitrox "qualified" diver who doesn't even know what PPO2 means (leave
alone, I would presume, how to calculate it?). How totally,
ridiculously, absurd. I suggest that that diver's Nitrox Instructor
could be criminally negligent if this person has a nitrox related incident.
 
Strike, I much look forward to reading what you have to say about
training standards in that article that you have mooted. No doubt you'll
let us know when, and where, it appears, hopefully even post it here. :-)
 
Cheers mate,
 
Christian